The journey begins here for the fiber arts to learn, create and to share ideas.

The Butler Spinners and Weavers Guild was founded in September of 1982 when Mary Ann Geiger gathered a group of ten people at the Butler Public Library. These people desired to organize a Guild to promote interest in and to teach the art of spinning and weaving.

Over the years the Butler Spinners and Weavers Guild has grown to include approximately 50 members. While emphasis is placed on spinning and weaving, members of the Guild also knit, crochet, felt, and raise their own fiber-supplying animals, including sheep, alpacas, and goats. No fiber related art is off limits to try! Our members expertise vary from beginning spinners and weavers to nationally and internationally known experts!

The Butler Spinners and Weavers Guild has been active from the beginning in local and regional Sheep-to-Shawl contests, including those at the Pennsylvania Farm Show (Harrisburg) and Penn’s Colony (Saxonburg), bringing many awards with them back to Butler. Throughout the years members have also demonstrated the art of spinning and weaving at many local events, knitting shops, and schools.

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PA Farm Show Sheep to Shawl Results

One week ago it was the 40th annual PA Farm Show Fleece to Shawl! Butler Spinners and Weaver’s Guild has participated almost every year since then.

I want to thank everyone who participated and supported our 2019 PA Farm Show Sheep to Shawl Team.  I know many of you watched from home, and some of you even traveled to Harrisburg to join the spectators.  There are a few pictures posted to the Farm Show’s Website here: Farm Show Sheep to Shawl Album but not any of our team or shawl.  I know some pictures were posted to our Facebook page, so thank you for your support there as well.

There were 9 teams in the competition, all but one of them completed a shawl for judging.  Our team The Butler County Peddalers placed 8th in the competition on January 9th; full results can be found toward the end of this PDF: Wool Results.   Our shawl did very well in the auction and was purchased for $675.

For those of you who are unfamiliar with the Sheep to Shawl competitions, here is what the brochure from the event says:

Sheep to Shawl means just that- a shawl crated from the wool shorn from a sheep, spun into yarn, and woven into the finished garment.  Each team is comprised of a shearer, three spinners, a carder, and a weaver.  The judging is broken down into the following categories:

Shearing: The shearer is judged on even shearing, uniformity, and lack of second cuts (shorter lengths of wool).

Fleece: Cleanliness, condition of fleece, luster and crimp.

Spinning: Spinners are judged on their individual spinning as well as how their spinning relates to the design of the shawl.  The members try to spin very evenly to produce a uniform team product.

Weaving: The judges will look for evenness in the weaving, checking closely for errors.  The selvage edges are examined for evenness and lack of pull-in.  The finished shawl must measure at least 22 inches wide and 78 inches long or points are deducted from the score.

Design: The design and appearance of the finished shawl counts for a large percentage of each team’s score.  Judges look for originality in design, difficulty of weave, color coordination between warp and weft, softness and “drape-ability”, and execution of the finished fringe.

Speed: The teams are awarded a bonus for finishing their shawl first, second, third, etc.  Speed combined with quality is the goal of each team.

More detailed rules for the competition are available here: Wool Department Rules PDF and we have more information on this and other competitions here: Competition Page.

I would like to begin to use this website as a place where anyone in our wonderful fiber community can find a voice and an audience. PLEASE comment below or contact me through the contact link if you like or don’t like this idea!